Smart Phones rule the world


Day Three in Bhairawa –

 If you haven’t been to the YouTube channel, check it out – I uploaded a nearly-six-minute Mega-code video last evening. Go to youtube and type in “Joe Niemczura” – it’s the Joe Niemczura channel!

 And twentysix more nurses have completed a version of the training. Another rickshaw ride this morning, packed up my stuff so as to not need to return to the UCMS Guest House in the afternoon.

Florence Nightingale

I hopped  off the rickshaw, paid the guy, went through  the hospital gate and over to the first building. Walked through the ER area, poked my head in to see what was cooking, and recognized Rama, one of my class members and a TNS grad, giving an IV med to a patient. She was wearing a skyblue sari and a lab coat, a big contrast from the patients, who wore dhotis or shorts and often a turban. In the sari, Rama seemed to glide  from bed to bed in the male-only ward like a vision of Florence Nightingale.  Cheerful as she glided over to me – the sari would billow slightly but you literally could not see her legs move – an amazing effect as if she was on a wheeled cart under all that rayon cloth. Rama  made me delete the first photo  – “I look too dark” – then posed for a couple more. Nepalis have gotten more sophisticated about digi cams – they now always insist of approving the photo right after it was taken.

 I went back out to get chiya and two samosas along with maize soup. A lot of Nepalis enjoy a samosa by breaking it up into the corn chowder this way.

 As I returned, I passed Room Number One, which as it turns out, is the place where the attendees must sign in since this training is “paid time” for them.

 We started off with ECG rhythms again, as people straggled in. The class seemed to “get it” better today; we also focused on lethal rhythms.

Paparazzi

I did the 12-lead lecture, and also my  lecture on respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation. For the 12-lead talk, I pulled out the poster from AHA on Acute Coronary Syndromes I brought, one of the set of six, and called everyone up for a closer look. About half got out their smartphones to take photos of it. A crush of cameras like paparazzi.  Yes folks, you can get an i-phone in rural Nepal.

 At a break I made a video as I interviewed a class participant, which I will put on YouTube; when I was done she pulled out her smartphone and asked “do you BlueTooth?” – but of course!

 For lunch we went to the same bhansa, once again squeezing about two dozen people into three tables. Lots of yoghurt consumed.

 Mega-code after lunch, over and over. Today was another hot day, this time a blazing summer sun. The AC was working, but there were periods of no electricity and the classroom heated up quickly during those times.

 The closest way to describe the heat is, similar to Florida in summer. Only wetter. 

 People were taking videos, of both the  mega-code teams and the critique. One showed me her video of the family scenario, from yesterday. I want that video! 

 A photo session at the end. I am now in several dozen FB pages in Bhairawa, Nepal.

Departure Committee

 I went to the transportation office to get my vehicle and driver to the airport. Front seat of a landrover-type SUV. As we were getting in, a bunch of the students spotted us, and now I was being accompanied by five of them, who live in the town (which is on the way). As we drove, we spotted two more, walking, and they also cheerfully  piled in. We let four of them off as we went along; three were still in the backseat as we proceeded – they were my ad hoc departing committee (!), using the opportunity to go to the terminal. At the airports, a Nepali can not get through the outer perimeter unless they have a good reason – and now these three were – officially – with me!

 I had an “e-ticket” for departure, and the guard at the outer perimeter was confused by this. The three women in the back all explained at once. Looking exasperated, he called his boss and waved us through. 

 At  the airport I got a call from the assistant administrator who was very cordial. I had paid my own plane ticket to get here and UCMS insisted they would reimburse and also they wanted me back for three additional days in July at which time they would also pay the flight.

 I told him I was quite happy with the way I was treated, had enjoyed the town, the students were great, but that just don’t think I will have the time, in July. Also, that I will write my feedback in a few days and that I look forward to formal evaluation.

 I also used my BB to compose a thank-you message to the people who arranged all this, please convey etc etc etc.

 Return to KTM was very straightforward. Two blond-haired Italian women were on the plane, but spoke no English, and of course I have forgotten all the Italian I ever knew. On the flight they looked through their Lonely Planet Guide (Italian Version).

Unpacked, sorted laundry, restacked papers – etc. Took a shower and shaved.

 The WiFi is now working here – O joy. This means I can upload some YouTube things I have accumulated…..

Tomorrow I teach at LNC in the ballroom; the morning subject will be mechanical ventilation.

 I may be adding a sixth cohort, BN students at Purbanchal University here in KTM, in July.

About Joe Niemczura, RN, MS

Experienced nursing educator and problem-solver. I have fifteen years of USA nursing faculty background. Add it with fifteen more devoted to adult critical care. In Nepal, I started teaching critical care skills in 2011. I figure out what they need to know in a Nepali practice setting. Then I teach it in a culturally appropriate way so that the boots-on-the-ground people will use it. I travel outside of Kathmandu Valley as well. When the recent violence happened, I knew the cities - I had trained people in those locations. One theme of my work has been collective culture and how it manifests itself in anger. Because this was a problem I incorporated elements of "situational awareness" training from the beginning, in 2011. Global Health Nursing is not all sweetness and light; not solely milk & honey and happy moms and babies.
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3 Responses to Smart Phones rule the world

  1. I’ve just returned from a medical education trip to Haiti, and it was the same thing, iPhones and Blackberries in the mountains, where there isn’t even electricity most of the time. Astounding!

    I love the smart phones, but feel tablets are a better tool for learning the foundations of health care. As the prices drop, I can’t begin to comprehend what this will mean for education. It is so exciting.

    How we can collectively share resources such as those you are using (rhythm strips, algorithms, scenarios, etc) with each other around the world?

  2. I’ve just returned from a medical education trip to Haiti, and it was the same thing, iPhones and Blackberries in the mountains, where there isn’t even electricity most of the time. Astounding!

    I love the smart phones, but feel tablets are a better tool for learning the foundations of health care. As the prices drop, I can’t begin to comprehend what this will mean for education. It is so exciting.

    How we can collectively share resources such as those you are using (rhythm strips, algorithms, scenarios, etc) with each other around the world?

  3. here is a video of evening activity in Bhairawa

    enjoy!

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