Link to Aloha Medical Mission video August 2012


The Aloha Medical Mission also goes to Nepal.

Brad Wong, MD is a retired surgeon from Honolulu who does a lot of international surgery volunteer work. In 2008 he spent time in Tansen, he and I overlapped there for a couple of weeks. Since then he has returned to Nepal but now goes to the eastern part of the country.

Here is a link to a 2012 video edited to show the work Aloha Medical Mission does in eastern Nepal.

He has a YouTube channel under the name of Bugswong.

Logistical challenge!

As you can guess, when A.M.M. goes somewhere, they deploy a quantity of supplies that is probably measured in tonnage, as opposed to my own humble project where I might bring a hundred kg of books. the planning for this is mindboggling. To pull it off requires a lot of fundraising. By comparison, I go on a shoestring when I make my trips.

Curious?

here is  the caption for the 2012 video:

In 2010 and 2011, the nonprofit Aloha Medical Mission brought a team of surgeons to the town of Dhankuta. Over each 10 day mission, we performed 140 major and 200 minor surgeries, saw 200 dental patients, and distributed 25 Ellen Meadows Prosthetic Hand Foundation LN-4 hands to amputees. We are preparing to return in 2012 to the town of Lahan.

If any reader of this blog is are ever thinking of going on a similar trip, to Nepal or any other country, please do contact me and I will share with you every thing I know so as to help you prepare.

About Joe Niemczura, RN, MS

Experienced nursing educator and problem-solver. I have fifteen years of USA nursing faculty background. Add it with fifteen more devoted to adult critical care. In Nepal, I started teaching critical care skills in 2011. I figure out what they need to know in a Nepali practice setting. Then I teach it in a culturally appropriate way so that the boots-on-the-ground people will use it. I travel outside of Kathmandu Valley as well. When the recent violence happened, I knew the cities - I had trained people in those locations. One theme of my work has been collective culture and how it manifests itself in anger. Because this was a problem I incorporated elements of "situational awareness" training from the beginning, in 2011. Global Health Nursing is not all sweetness and light; not solely milk & honey and happy moms and babies.
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