part two of debriefing video is now on YouTube July 25th 2015


This will be brief. please read the blog entries over the past few months that address the issue of thrashing of health care workers in Nepal. It’s something every Nepali nurse or doc needs to be aware of.

Ke garne?

You can not always control the behavior of an upset family or crowd of people, but you can become “street smart.” You can analyze the security needs of a workplace. You can set things up so that access is controlled and activities are monitored. You can work with the chowkidars so they know their role. You can identify when the situation is escalating, and how to de-escalate. You can help the family grieve appropriately and stay safe.

First, the scenario itself:

Next the first part of debriefing in which the actors told what they thought:

Now, the debriefing response by the teachers:

click here for the link.

https://youtu.be/fgp7PZRG450MC

Chitwan Medical College in Bharatpur, where this was filmed, is among the top tier of Teaching Hospitals in Nepal. I appreciate their willingness to do this. They are a training resource for the country.

About Joe Niemczura, RN, MS

Experienced nursing educator and problem-solver. I have fifteen years of USA nursing faculty background. Add it with fifteen more devoted to adult critical care. In Nepal, I started teaching critical care skills in 2011. I figure out what they need to know in a Nepali practice setting. Then I teach it in a culturally appropriate way so that the boots-on-the-ground people will use it. I travel outside of Kathmandu Valley as well. When the recent violence happened, I knew the cities - I had trained people in those locations. One theme of my work has been collective culture and how it manifests itself in anger. Because this was a problem I incorporated elements of "situational awareness" training from the beginning, in 2011. Global Health Nursing is not all sweetness and light; not solely milk & honey and happy moms and babies.
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