Any USA acute care pediatric nurses out there? plan now for summer 2018 in Nepal!


You are now reading the blog to accompany a project that trains Nepali nurses and doctors in critical care skills using a 2- or 3-day course based on the American Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course. ( let me be clear: we are not the “official” course). My summer trip for 2017 is a bit shorter than usual, but we still managed to train about 350 nurses and doctors in 13 sessions ( actually, session #13 has not finished quite yet) and BLS to 40 dental students (I don’t usually teach BLS as a standalone course, but that is another story).

img_20150420_135521

I teach a lot of basic skills used in critical care, including ecg. The emphasis is on applying, not just listening to lecture. we use Scenario-based simulation approach” – very active.

Future Plans

I plan to return to Nepal in 2018, and I’m thinking about what the goals would be. To some degree we are still educating people as to what ACLS is and why it is needed. We are making progress on that front, and in the planning for summer 2017 we received many more requests to partner with host sites than we could possibly fulfill.

Building Community

We’re still working to develop more Nepali professionals with the expertise and confidence to lead this course. To truly be an independent teacher of this material requires a lot of experience and confidence, more than you would be able to develop in just a weekend-long “train-the-trainer” course. There needs to be a support system to go along with it, something we take for granted in USA. A sense of community and shared purpose built around the idea that we can prevent excess deaths with better emergency response in this specific area. The people who need the training are the young nurses and docs at the bedside in off hours, and though the “seniors” need to understand it, we have to agree that the “seniors” are not really the ones who need it the most.

Picture 443

Most Americans have a vision of Nepal as a set of quaint villages. It’s true that much of the country is rural, but this project goes mainly to cities large enough to support a medical college and teaching hospitals.

Pediatrics

one of our youngest patients

Nepal is a low income country and the profile of illnesses are not quite what you would see in USA. Read my first book, The Hospital at the End of the World, to learn more.

One theme to emerge this year was the specific need for a parallel course in pediatric emergencies. This was requested from a variety of contacts. In USA there are several such courses, the best known being “PALS” – Pediatric Advanced Life Support. So – why not?

I do not believe that PALS should be adopted widely in Nepal lock-stock-and-barrel any more than I believe that the USA ACLS course is appropriate for Nepal. First and foremost, the USA course requires that all sessions and discussions be conducted in English-only, a requirement that is simply ridiculous especially in rural Nepal. Also, the pedagogical framework of the South Asian educational system in which Nepali nurses and doctors are immersed is a consideration. These courses are at their best when they focus on practical hands-on psychomotor skills, and effective training needs to be designed with this in mind.

Invitation

Having said that, I am interested to find some people with USA acute care pediatric experience who are PALS-I (or PEARS-I, another similar course) who would be interested to come to Nepal in 2018 and teach it. Any takers?

Terms and conditions

the deal would be:

You would pay your own airfare.

You would need to commit to a month here. You would need to study the culture beforehand. No helicoptering in and out.

You would need to agree to use materials and methods appropriate to the audience. No PowerPoint, no long lectures. A good place to start exploring the approach would be the any of the sites that describes “Low Dose High Frequency” (LDHF) training. There are many, just Google the term.

You need to decide in fall 2017 whether you want to do this, because there is a lot to learn before you go the first time.

I should add that I have a friendly relationship with the Center for Medical Simulation here in Kathmandu. They are Nepal’s one-and-only American Heart Association Official International Training Center. If you want to start by teaching the American PALS course as is with no adaptations to Nepal, I am certain they would be thrilled to collaborate with you.

CCNEPal is a grassroots shoestring training operation, and we are looking for like-minded persons who wish to join us as we teach and train. Feel free to browse this site and the related links ( see the column at right). For more info send an email to joeniemczura@gmail.com.

Advertisements

About Joe Niemczura, RN, MS

These blogs, and my books, and videos are written on the principle that any person embarking on something similar to what I do will gain more preparation than I first had, by reading them. I have fifteen years of USA nursing faculty background. Add to it fifteen more devoted to adult critical care. In Nepal, I started teaching critical care skills in 2011. I figure out what they need to know in a Nepali practice setting. Then I teach it in a culturally appropriate way so that the boots-on-the-ground people will use it. One theme of my work has been collective culture and how it manifests itself in anger. Because this was a problem I incorporated elements of "situational awareness" training from the beginning, in 2011.
This entry was posted in medical volunteer in Nepal and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s