Team of Quebec Nurse educators to visit Nepal in spring 2019 – want to meet them?


I got a unusual email that led to a phone call.

Hello Joe,

I’m a Canadian nurse and educator, planning a trip to Nepal in the spring.  I have been to Nepal twice before (about 30 years ago) with my husband, we loved the culture and country very much.  In 2012 and 2014 I volunteered (the second time with a 4 person teaching team) in Bangladesh at the Grameen Caledonian College of Nursing.  We offered some workshops to teachers in their nursing program on moving patients safely, CPR, team teaching, skills (venipuncture, etc) and while there we had an opportunity to visit local hospitals and clinics.  Our visit to Nepal would be for about 2 – 3 weeks.
We’ve applied for a small grant to help us come to Nepal to have a similar visit. We’ve been in touch through Nepali friends with the Nursing Dept at Tribhuvan University.  We would also like to connect with a school that offers the ANM program.
In Bangladesh we were able to donate some supplies and equipment through our own fundraising (venipucture arm, cpr mannequins, sliding sheets, etc). We would be prepared to do so in Nepal.
I’ve read your articles before and just thought I’d get in touch to see what suggestions you might have.
Thank you,  Debbi Templeton
.
.
This made me smile
How could I ignore such an email? I sometimes get these, and it’s always nice to chat, so I gave her my phone number. We had a delightful conversation. Debbi and her colleagues are just the sort of person who can contribute to nursing education in Nepal.
Ms. Templeton has her BSN from McGill University in Montreal and a MSN from the University of British Columbia. McGill is probably the top nursing program in the country of Canada.
She would be joined by three other nursing educators from the Chateauguay Valley Career Education Centre, located in a rural suburb of Montreal, not far from the border with Vermont, USA. (oh, and her husband, who is not a nurse).
Here is a photo showing the group wearing their kurta in B’desh:

team templeton

Debbi, Kim, Bev, and Daniele

and they toured a tea plantation:

Templeton team (2)

How we can make this work:

Letter

First, for them to get travel funding from the Canadian Government, they need a Nepal host school that would provide them a letter of invitation. As I understand it, such a letter is legally accepted by the Nepal government to allow them to teach nursing while in Nepal.

Previous international travel

This group has volunteered in South Asia in the past, as well as central America. This is not their first trip overseas.

Pokhara? Bharatpur?

Next, they will happily collaborate with Nepali nurse educators while in Nepal. They will start in Kathmandu but they are intrigued by the idea of getting out of Kathmandu Valley.

Contact them:

Debbi Templeton is on FaceBook, send her a friend request and get the dialog going!

Her email address is:

drkbbtempleton@gmail.com. 

This kind of exchange is really wonderful when it works. For me, my blog, the CCNEPal FaceBook page, and the YouTube channel are set up to help westerners prepare for such kind of travel.

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About Joe Niemczura, RN, MS

These blogs, and my books, and videos are written on the principle that any person embarking on something similar to what I do will gain more preparation than I first had, by reading them. I have fifteen years of USA nursing faculty background. Add to it fifteen more devoted to adult critical care. In Nepal, I started teaching critical care skills in 2011. I figure out what they need to know in a Nepali practice setting. Then I teach it in a culturally appropriate way so that the boots-on-the-ground people will use it. One theme of my work has been collective culture and how it manifests itself in anger. Because this was a problem I incorporated elements of "situational awareness" training from the beginning, in 2011.
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